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  1. Yesterday
  2. editengine

    what are YOU lookin' at?

    https://youtu.be/fe7_ST_OW54 Meet Wayne
  3. Last week
  4. GreenRobot

    Random

    Cats are not anti-social. Cats are choosy about the humans they socialize with.
  5. GreenRobot

    What are YOU reading?

    I'm re-reading the Binti trilogy by Nnedi Okorafor and liking it even better this time around. Afro-futurism with aliens and space travel and lots of maths.
  6. xen0phile

    Random

    @Garage_Rubin
  7. xen0phile

    Random

    Like a quarter of the houses I see in Seattle have this sign, and, like, I guess I agree with every statement (decontextualized), but now I associate the sign with "Oh, hey, I'm a sanctimonious dipshit who can afford a single-family house in Seattle"
  8. heavyboots

    What are YOU reading?

    The Poppy War by R F Kuang — Fairly fast-reading adventure of an orphan girl who is attempting to survive and insure her future employment by getting trained at an elite military academy in a place that reads very similarly to a dynastic China with magic. I mostly enjoyed it although I could tell as I neared the end that it was part one of a series and that we were being set up to need to read that too. Pretty fun read though, overall.
  9. heavyboots

    What are YOU reading?

    How Long 'til Black Future Month by N. K. Jemesin — A short story collection by the author of The Broken Earth trilogy. Some of these are amazing, some are just ok, but it was a pretty satisfactory read all in all, although I honestly feel like I'm almost a disappointment as a reader by the end, lol. She's got some very literary short stories, and then occasionally she throws in something really simple but overtly sci-fi like The Trojan Girl and my ears perk up and I thoroughly enjoy it before going back to grinding through what is by most measurements a better story, like The City Born Great. At any rate, largely enjoyable even if it was a bit more work to get through it than I would have liked. And I doubt anyone will question the relevance or quality of most of the stories in it!
  10. xen0phile

    The Car Thread

    Seriously, it's the sedan-iest sedan I've had the blandness of driving. That's not a bad thing! I hate how everything's a crossover now. How the car market could just not handle normie sedans. Fuck, I don't need the car to, like, give me a blowjob. Just want it to convey my ass to a job quicker than a bus or walking or biking.
  11. remotevoices

    What are YOU reading?

    Just read three novel/las with distinct parallels in tone/theme, haunted works, in their own way. White Tears - Hari Kunzru - I've read work by Hari before and caught him on a panel at EIBF a few years ago and been meaning to read this for a while. The first part of the book is wonderfully written, lots of stuff about field recording, environmental sound and the role of music in transporting the listener. But as it goes on it becomes increasingly unsettling. Seth is nobody particularly, but becomes best friends with Carter, who is one of the most popular guys in university, tattooed, dreadlocked, son of wealth. It is sound that brings them together. Carter keeps pushing further back in time, driven, only listening to black music, searching for an overwhelming authenticity. Seth captures something on his soundwalks of New York, through obsession and careful tracking through recordings they find a ghost record. But of course, they don't understand that, until it is too late. A book about music, about authenticity and appropriation, about wealth and who it was built on. As narratives layer is becomes harder to follow, and at times I wasn't always sure I was keeping track. I think a lot of that is deliberate, to unsettle the reader and build on the novel's core haunting. The Sea Dreams It Is The Sky - John Hornor Jacobs - I guess after the success of tor's novella line, and various other small publishers wading into the field, it isn't surprised to see someone like Voyager give it a go. I stumbled on this over the weekend and pretty much read it cover to cover in last day or so. Isabel is living in Malaga, a black clad, lesbian, professor and exile from a South American coup. When she stumbles on The Eye, as the one eyed old man is known locally, she recognises in an almost uncanny way, that they have fled from the same country. After they become friends she learns his true identity as an infamous, lecherous poet. He gets a mysterious letter and decides he must go home, he leaves her money and asks her to take care of his flat, and to "feed the cat, for your protection". There she finds two works, one a translation in progress of a book she realises to be "forbidden knowledge" and the other the account of how this material came into his possession and how he was tortured as a result. The more sucked in she becomes the more uncertain she finds reality, presences in the dark and strange experiences. A good quick read, too much of it perhaps revolves around The Eye's journals, but with that you get the haunted sense of exile and uncertainty. We Get The Monsters We Deserve - Marcus Sedgwick - this was one of my fairly spontaneous purchases at the EIBF 2018, I think it was in the kids shop, a YA novel perhaps. Though, I think in this case that is fairly irrelevant. Regardless the book is illustrated, interspersed with shots of trees, and books, and odd little things, so that the ~260 pages probably becomes more of a novella length when you take that into account. Marcus has decided to move to the abyss, or at least half way up a mountain, into a decrepit little chalet somewhere between Geneva and Evian, just before winter comes in. Marcus, a writer, is seeking monsters, seeking to write his next book, but he is haunted. He hates Mary's book, and yet it haunts him. As the narrative progresses we learn Mary's book is Frankenstein, and that Marcus has triangulated locations in the book to find himself where he is. Told as a letter to his publisher he goes through the process of asking why he is even there, to an increased sense of isolation as he hears noises in the night, escalating as he increasingly feels trapped. So White Tears is haunted by music, Sea/Sky by exile, and Monsters by a book. But at least of the three of them, this one doesn't include any torture! Unless you are a writer, I suppose, in which case it explores ideas of ownership and creativity, where do we lose ownership, do we create the monsters, or do they create us? I managed to be unsettled by all three, especially reading them all in such close proximity. I suspect White Tears is the most important of the three, but probably also the most difficult.
  12. StageDrifter

    Creative Endeavors

    Gibson:Board Into a New Year's Post, where I don't normally drink, for bloody good reason, but it's NY's. Me, on Facebook. Remembering Toronto in older age, faces. Cheers, certainly, and somewhat more. Young people on message boards...
  13. xen0phile

    Gibsonian

    (well: bugged, not hacked, since it's a dumb mistake, not malicious)
  14. xen0phile

    Gibsonian

    e-scooter... hacked
  15. xen0phile

    Gibsonian

    Software update to bike/electric scooter share service, Lime, causes scooters' OS to reboot mid-ride, triggered anti-theft brakes (and presumably throwing some riders) :O
  16. editengine

    So what happened to YOU today?

    Also, it snowed. 6 inches of fluff. Other than a freakish November dusting this is the first bit of it this year.
  17. editengine

    So what happened to YOU today?

    My mom is a technically literate 70 year old but she has more issues with computers than any person I know. She buys a new one every 2-3 years because they "slow down" too much. The latest is a 2 day ordeal to update windows, that has resulted in her reinstalling windows after 4 hours on the phone with Microsoft 2nd level support. Part of her issue is a weird reliance in 3rd party anti-virus and backup programs that she doesn't need but feels are critical. I long ago swore off helping her because it means hours of mindless clicking around problems that would be solved with a clean reformat and google drive.
  18. xen0phile

    So what happened to YOU today?

    I've never really been very hurt by the death of a loved one, but I have had moderate mental breakdowns over the loss of paradigms and ideas, once held dear, which I later realized were wrong. I am not great at humaning.
  19. xen0phile

    So what happened to YOU today?

    They cut out some of the cancer from my dad, but I guess there's still some left. He's going to get chemo now. And, of course, I guess he could still die soon. Okay.
  20. xen0phile

    Random

  21. Earlier
  22. xen0phile

    Random

    Folks, I just don't know--I just don't know if I can follow this heuristic when people like Stanley Kubrick exist:
  23. xen0phile

    Random

  24. heavyboots

    Random

    If your day is going poorly, just feel happy it's probably still not as bad as this guy's day. 😹
  25. db

    Random

    I just remember trying to get a 20-year on my first condo, and the best they would do was 10-year fixed or ARM. I went with an ARM and it was fine. If you go with a broker, you can get private mortgages with different kinds of terms, but the big banks don’t go past 10-years. Canadians don’t tend to use their houses as an ATM, though.
  26. editengine

    Random

    Yeah, and that makes sense a lot of the time. But when you have both a massive housing bubble and a rising rate environment it is a recipe for disaster. The 30 year FRM costs buyers more but its a hedge against this sort of thing. Unless the Canadian government steps in and forces investors to share the burden this could make the US foreclosure crisis look like a walk in the park.
  27. GreenRobot

    the comic thread

    Belzebubs
  28. db

    Random

    In Canada you don't tend to get a 30-year mortgage! 5 or 10 is typical, then you refinance what's left at the end of that. They just don't offer them.
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